The Beauty of French Garden Furniture

There is perhaps no furniture more beautiful than French garden furniture. The French have exquisite taste when it comes to design, and you would be hard pressed to find other types of furniture that generate the same type of atmosphere. Authentic garden furnishings of this kind are available online, and many upscale stores also carry authentic pieces in other countries as well. They are a great way to add a sophisticated touch without making an overstatement. Most French furnishings will be simple constructions, yet have very intriguing design patterns.

Such garden furniture is a great choice to set a relaxing, outdoor atmosphere. Before purchasing any fittings claiming to be authentic, make sure you check the reputation of the company you are dealing with, whether it be online or offline. There are some businesses out there that will try to pass off Amish furniture (which can also be very beautiful), or something worse like a poorly made cheap imitation as authentic. This is a rarity, but it is always a good idea to check before you decide to make a purchase, it never hurts to be a little cautious. Authentic French fittings may be more expensive than other types, but not overly so.

It may remind you of a cafe somewhere on the country side if you have a full set of French furniture outside. The tables and chairs seem to have a pleasing effect on everyone, many people feel that it makes the area look more romantic, which it does! If you are married this would be a great gift for your significant other, something both of you will enjoy. It can be made out of both wood and metal, and the craftsmanship is usually outstanding. French furnishings lasts a long time before succumbing to the effects of wear and tear, items purchased are usually very sturdy.

One of the down sides of French furnishings is that there usually aren’t many options on color. Straight black or white are the most common colors, you can find brown sometimes as well, but you usually do not find anything really bright. This is OK for most people, but if you are looking for a brighter shade you may have to look around for awhile, or even repaint the furniture. There are, however, many different choices available when it comes to the design pattern. As long as bright colors are not a must for you, there is certainly something you will like when it comes to French garden furniture.

Architect or Building Designer – Who Do You Choose?

Thinking of building a new home or complex? Will you use an architect or a building designer?

Both are involved in the design of buildings – their appearance, layout, structure, and so on. But what’s the difference?

The simplest difference is a legal one. To be called an “architect” in NSW, you have to be registered with the Board of Architects of NSW. The title “building designer” can be used by anyone designing buildings.

But that’s hardly even scratching the surface. Brian Basford is a building designer and treasurer of the Building Designers Association of NSW. He suggests that building designers are generally less expensive, and mostly involved in less flamboyant buildings. “It’s horses for courses. Most architects probably wouldn’t want to design a single bedroom extension for a pensioner, whereas I’ve done a lot of that.”

Brian also stressed that there are quite often overlaps between what architects do and what building designers do. There’s no simple rule. “But no matter what the job, good building designers and good architects both produce quality work”, he says.

Architect Gary Kurzer agrees that architects are more likely to be involved with more distinctive, “up-market” buildings. But not because of cost. “Architects work to your budget just like building designers. The real reason is that architects are a little more likely to stretch the boundaries and challenge convention.”

According to Gary, you should generally choose an architect if you want more than just a literal translation of your brief. “My clients normally have a rough idea of what they want. I take that idea and transform it into something they love, but could never have imagined themselves.”

The most important thing is knowing what you want from the service, and choosing someone that suits your job.

And whether you choose an architect or building designer, remember, qualifications are no guarantee of quality. Always ask to see previous examples of their work. Ask for references from previous customers. Ask to see their qualifications. Ask how long they’ve been working. Do they have professional indemnity insurance? Are they a member of an accredited body?…

In the end, it’s like anything else… there’s no substitute for common sense.

Thanks to Gary Kurzer, Architect, 0411044448, and Brian Basford, Building Designer.

FAQs

Q: Are architects and building designers the same thing?

A: No. Architects must be registered with the Board of Architects of NSW.

Q: Will I get a better design from an architect?

A: Not necessarily. The only guarantee is a minimum level of qualifications. Architects must have a Bachelor of Architecture degree (5 years) as well as the demonstrated ability to deal with clients and satisfy their requirements. Generally this means at least a couple of years experience in an architect’s office.

Q: Are building designers more in touch with builders and other trades?

A: Not necessarily. Architects are trained to deal with and manage all aspects of the building project. It all comes down to the individual’s experience and abilities.

Q: Are Building designers “would-be” architects?

A: No. Building design is a recognised profession with its own national body (the BDAA) offering 3 levels of accreditation based on experience and quality – but registration isn’t compulsory. Many building designers have the qualifications to register with the Board of Architects but they choose not to because they don’t think the name “architect” is worth the ongoing cost of registration.

Q: Are architects more expensive?

A: Not necessarily. An architect will work to your budget like a building designer. They can do anything from a simple design to very complex interior and exterior detailing to superintendence of the building process. Your building costs and ongoing running costs may also be less. For example, find out if your architect is incorporating cost-saving measures into the building process. They may also design to take advantage of natural lighting, ventilation, heating, cooling, etc. which will save you less in electricity.

Q: How do I tell if they’re really an architect?

A: Call the Board of Architects of NSW – (02) 93564900 or visit [http://www.boarch.nsw.gov.au/f_consumer.html].

Q: How do I look for an accredited building designer?

A: Call the Building Designers Association of NSW – Sydney (02) 49264855 or visit http://www.bdansw.com.au or [http://www.bdaa.com.au/index.htm].

Q: Where else can I go for further information?

A: http://www.architecture.com.au – Royal Australian Institute of Architects

http://www.bdansw.com.au – Building Designers Association of NSW

What Kind of Steel Building Designs Can You Use?

Adding a Unique Touch to Your Boat Building Designs

Now, if you have read any of my other articles on boat building designs, you will have seen that I rate high quality boat plans at the top of the list for the amateur boat builder. However, today you’ll be shocked to see me going off plan (well, at least a little bit!).

Don’t get me wrong, I stand by what I’ve said before and plans are extremely important, but I’m also a man who likes to see a little originality and personal flare when it comes to woodworking. It’s a little like adding your own signature touch to the build. Therefore, in this article I’m suggesting you modify your boat with some unique touches.

This could be done with the finish, for example the way you paint it, but for a longer lasting and more professional touch you could consider making you mark on the woodwork. One technique you could choose to use here would be carving the wood in a particular shape for certain parts of the boat, such as a bird’s beak on the handrails for instance.

It doesn’t have to be anything too fancy if you don’t feel so confident and don’t want to ruin hours of following plans by the book, only to mess it up with the last touches. It also doesn’t have to just be for show if you’re not that kind of person and you could add some with added functionality, such as drip grooves or capillary breaks. These are great touches that will also help protect your boat from rot.

Really, it’s up to you what you choose to do and how far you go with it. You may like to go and look at other boats for inspiration and then come up with your own design. The world is your oyster, so just have fun playing around. If you’re building a larger boat, or you may want to create your own figurehead if you are feeling particularly adventurous, or you could scale this idea down for smaller boats.

You have spent the time and put in blood, sweat and tears building your boat, following to the plan to make sure you get it all just right. This is now the time to reward that hard work by having a little fun with those woodworking skills you have learnt and developed along the way. It will also make sure that your boat is looking extra special as you embark on your maiden voyage.

In conclusion, as mentioned in the introduction, I still firmly believe in following high quality plans. The majority of your boat is designed for functionality and safety and you need to make sure that these things remain in tact. However, where you can, add a little of yourself to your boat and personalize it with your own touch.

If you enjoyed this article or found it useful, please take a moment to leave a comment and let me know. I would love to know your thoughts, so just drop me a line. For more information on boat planning and designs, or for similar boat building topics, also please feel free to visit my website, you’re always welcome aboard. Just click on the links below.